6-year-old dies from rattlesnake bite in Colorado, experts raise awareness

Family friends tell 11 News the tragic incident happened at the Bluestem Prairie Open Space in Security-Widefield. The little boy was bitten July 5 and passed away several days later.
Published: Jul. 11, 2022 at 6:24 PM MDT|Updated: Jul. 12, 2022 at 5:28 AM MDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) - 11 News is learning more about a 6-year-old boy who was bitten and killed by a rattlesnake.

Family friends tell 11 News the tragic incident happened in the Bluestem Prairie Open Space in Security-Widefield. The little boy was bitten the evening of July 5 and passed away earlier Monday. Per family wishes, 11 News will not provide information on what happened or the little boy’s name at this time.

Colorado Springs Fire Department and Colorado Parks and Wildlife are providing tips for how to prevent being bitten by rattlesnake, as well as what to do if the worst case scenario were to occur. Both agencies say if you are ever bitten by a rattlesnake, make sure to remain calm. If you move around too much it will spread the venom faster through your body. Make sure to call 911 so anti-venom can be administered immediately.

CSFD tells 11 News leaving a rattlesnake bite unattended can lead to you having nausea and dizziness. Your blood pressure will also fall and your heart rate can go up.

CPW says to make sure you know the differences between snakes in our area. Rattlesnakes have rattles and are venomous, while bull snakes do not have rattles and are not venomous. Identifying the right snake will help hospitals apply the right anti-venom.

“The best thing to do is take a picture of it or try to get the best description of it, but make sure you can still keep your distance,” said Lt. Joey Buttenwieser, Colorado Springs Fire Department. “We don’t want to risk someone else getting struck or getting struck again by that snake.”

Experts with CPW also explain what to do if you ever encounter a rattlesnake on a trail.

“If you are encountered by a rattlesnake in your yards or around the trail, just pause so you make sure you know it’s not behind you or beside you,” said Cassidy English, district wildlife manager, Colorado Parks and Wildlife. “You want to locate it first so you don’t take a step closer to it. Once you locate it, back away slowly from it. Just put a lot of distance between you and the snake.”

Experts also say sucking venom out of a wound can make it worse. It is a myth.

Copyright 2022 KKTV. All rights reserved.