Kidnapping and Sex Assault Survivor Tells Victims to Get Help

It was June of 2006 when Doris Rivera-Black became the victim of a violent crime at the hands of her own estranged husband. Rivera-Black said Jaime Duran forced her into his SUV, made her take off her clothes, and drove nearly 50 miles. Parked next to the train tracks he sexually assaulted her.

"It was like watching a nightmare or watching a horror movie," said Rivera-Black.

In shock and sick to her stomach, she said she begged Duran to stop at a convenience store for water.

"He took the phones and he left the keys in the ignition and it was like a sign from God this is your chance to get away," she said.

As soon as Duran stepped into the store Rivera-Black jumped into the driver's seat and took off.

"The look that he gave I can only describe it as he was so angry and
that if he had the opportunity to kill me right there he would have done so," said Rivera-Black.

She didn't know where she was but said she knew if she could to I-25 she could get home. And she did. When she turned down her street she saw the flashing blue lights of police and deputies surrounding her home.

"I put my hands up and I heard someone in the background say, 'It's Doris, it's Doris'," she said.

Duran was caught and is now in prison for the rest of his life. Rivera-Black now teaches women self-defense techniques. She pulls from her experience as a domestic violence survivor and her experience as a former El Paso County Sheriff's deputy.

Rivera-Black now looks back on what she calls warning signs early in her marriage. She said Duran started to get controlling once she took her job as a deputy.

"He would just show up out of the blue," said Rivera-Black.

Or call her non-stop throughout the day.

"I could be in a cell handling an inmate and my work pager would be going off the hook," she said.

Rivera-Black said Duran even threatened suicide when she told him she didn't want to stay in the marriage.

She said she knew she had to get out once one of her daughters spoke up.

"My oldest daughter, she was 12 at the time, she told me she sits outside the bedroom door with a phone getting ready to call 911," said Rivera-Black. "That's what did it for me. I said I cannot do this anymore. I'm hurting my kids."

She kicked him out and got a restraining order. About a week later he kidnapped her.

It's a story she tells hoping other women in abusive relationships get help.

"Talk to someone, tell someone what is going on," said Rivera-Black. "There are so many support groups, there are so many programs and organizations that will help you get through this."

If you or someone you know needs help call TESSA's crisis line at 719-633-3819. It's an agency that helps people who are victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

If you'd like more information about Rivera-Black's "NEVER a victim!" self-defense and awareness classes call 719-339-1959 or go to the following website:
http://www.never-a-victim.org/


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