Consumer Reports: Kids & Caffeine

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Children could be getting a lot more caffeine than you realize. Manufacturers are adding it to more and more products and companies don't have to list how much caffeine they've added. Consumer Reports just analyzed 25 drinks and foods and has important advice for parents.

Like many parents, Dawn Manniello (PRON: Man-YELL-oh) doesn't want her children drinking caffeinated sodas. She says it gets them all wound up.

"Children are energetic enough as it is. I don't feel they have to be pumped up with extra caffeine."

She knows there's caffeine in Pepsi and Coke, so she limits those. But caffeine is in lots of other products, too, including Mountain Dew.

Consumer Reports' David Heim says if caffeine has been added to a food, you'll see it listed under ingredients. But manufacturers don't have to list how much. And if caffeine is found naturally in foods, such as coffee or chocolate, it doesn't have to be listed on the label at all.
Consumer Reports checked the caffeine content in a variety of foods and drinks and turned up some surprising results.

"Ounce for ounce Sunkist Orange soda has nearly as much caffeine as colas do."

So does the VitaminWater from Glaceau (PRON: GLASS-ee-oh) and this Sobe (PRON: SO-bee) Energy drink.

There's also a hefty dose of caffeine in several new drinks, including
d-n-l, Pepsi Blue, Atomic Jacked
Apple Juice Drink and Red Fusion from Dr. Pepper.

Manufacturers say caffeine adds flavor.

Consumer Reports testers asked 56 middle-school-aged kids to do a taste test.

"What I need you to do is take two sips of the first one..."

The children were given unmarked cups of regular Coke and Pepsi, as well as the caffeine-free versions. There was no clear-cut preference.

"They were both sweet and like bubbly."

"They both tasted the same to me."

Some children actually liked the caffeine-free colas better.

"The first one it had more taste and flavor to me than the second one."

Consumer Reports' advice for parents — check the label on drinks closely. You'll find plenty of caffeine-free sodas, including Orange Slice, Mug Root Beer and Sprite.

And remember, caffeine doesn't have to be listed on the label of chocolate or coffee-flavored foods because the caffeine occurs naturally. In its study, Consumer Reports found that a small container of Dannon's Coffee Flavored Low Fat Yogurt has the same amount of caffeine as a can of Coke.

You can get a complete listing of the amount of caffeine found in the products Consumer Reports analyzed by going to Consumerreports.org. And if you want to see how quickly you can spot a caffeinated product — try taking the online caffeine quiz you'll find there.

Children could be getting a lot more caffeine than you realize. Manufacturers are adding it to more and more products and companies don't have to list how much caffeine they've added. Consumer Reports just analyzed 25 drinks and foods and has important advice for parents.

Like many parents, Dawn Manniello (PRON: Man-YELL-oh) doesn't want her children drinking caffeinated sodas. She says it gets them all wound up.

"Children are energetic enough as it is. I don't feel they have to be pumped up with extra caffeine."

She knows there's caffeine in Pepsi and Coke, so she limits those. But caffeine is in lots of other products, too, including Mountain Dew.

Consumer Reports' David Heim says if caffeine has been added to a food, you'll see it listed under ingredients. But manufacturers don't have to list how much. And if caffeine is found naturally in foods, such as coffee or chocolate, it doesn't have to be listed on the label at all.
Consumer Reports checked the caffeine content in a variety of foods and drinks and turned up some surprising results.

"Ounce for ounce Sunkist Orange soda has nearly as much caffeine as colas do."

So does the VitaminWater from Glaceau (PRON: GLASS-ee-oh) and this Sobe (PRON: SO-bee) Energy drink.

There's also a hefty dose of caffeine in several new drinks, including
d-n-l, Pepsi Blue, Atomic Jacked
Apple Juice Drink and Red Fusion from Dr. Pepper.

Manufacturers say caffeine adds flavor.

Consumer Reports testers asked 56 middle-school-aged kids to do a taste test.

"What I need you to do is take two sips of the first one..."

The children were given unmarked cups of regular Coke and Pepsi, as well as the caffeine-free versions. There was no clear-cut preference.

"They were both sweet and like bubbly."

"They both tasted the same to me."

Some children actually liked the caffeine-free colas better.

"The first one it had more taste and flavor to me than the second one."

Consumer Reports' advice for parents — check the label on drinks closely. You'll find plenty of caffeine-free sodas, including Orange Slice, Mug Root Beer and Sprite.

And remember, caffeine doesn't have to be listed on the label of chocolate or coffee-flavored foods because the caffeine occurs naturally. In its study, Consumer Reports found that a small container of Dannon's Coffee Flavored Low Fat Yogurt has the same amount of caffeine as a can of Coke.

You can get a complete listing of the amount of caffeine found in the products Consumer Reports analyzed by going to Consumerreports.org. And if you want to see how quickly you can spot a caffeinated product — try taking the online caffeine quiz you'll find there.

Children could be getting a lot more caffeine than you realize. Manufacturers are adding it to more and more products and companies don't have to list how much caffeine they've added. Consumer Reports just analyzed 25 drinks and foods and has important advice for parents.

Like many parents, Dawn Manniello (PRON: Man-YELL-oh) doesn't want her children drinking caffeinated sodas. She says it gets them all wound up.

"Children are energetic enough as it is. I don't feel they have to be pumped up with extra caffeine."

She knows there's caffeine in Pepsi and Coke, so she limits those. But caffeine is in lots of other products, too, including Mountain Dew.

Consumer Reports' David Heim says if caffeine has been added to a food, you'll see it listed under ingredients. But manufacturers don't have to list how much. And if caffeine is found naturally in foods, such as coffee or chocolate, it doesn't have to be listed on the label at all.
Consumer Reports checked the caffeine content in a variety of foods and drinks and turned up some surprising results.

"Ounce for ounce Sunkist Orange soda has nearly as much caffeine as colas do."

So does the VitaminWater from Glaceau (PRON: GLASS-ee-oh) and this Sobe (PRON: SO-bee) Energy drink.

There's also a hefty dose of caffeine in several new drinks, including
d-n-l, Pepsi Blue, Atomic Jacked
Apple Juice Drink and Red Fusion from Dr. Pepper.

Manufacturers say caffeine adds flavor.

Consumer Reports testers asked 56 middle-school-aged kids to do a taste test.

"What I need you to do is take two sips of the first one..."

The children were given unmarked cups of regular Coke and Pepsi, as well as the caffeine-free versions. There was no clear-cut preference.

"They were both sweet and like bubbly."

"They both tasted the same to me."

Some children actually liked the caffeine-free colas better.

"The first one it had more taste and flavor to me than the second one."

Consumer Reports' advice for parents — check the label on drinks closely. You'll find plenty of caffeine-free sodas, including Orange Slice, Mug Root Beer and Sprite.

And remember, caffeine doesn't have to be listed on the label of chocolate or coffee-flavored foods because the caffeine occurs naturally. In its study, Consumer Reports found that a small container of Dannon's Coffee Flavored Low Fat Yogurt has the same amount of caffeine as a can of Coke.

You can get a complete listing of the amount of caffeine found in the products Consumer Reports analyzed by going to Consumerreports.org. And if you want to see how quickly you can spot a caffeinated product — try taking the online caffeine quiz you'll find there.

Children could be getting a lot more caffeine than you realize. Manufacturers are adding it to more and more products and companies don't have to list how much caffeine they've added. Consumer Reports just analyzed 25 drinks and foods and has important advice for parents.

Like many parents, Dawn Manniello (PRON: Man-YELL-oh) doesn't want her children drinking caffeinated sodas. She says it gets them all wound up.

"Children are energetic enough as it is. I don't feel they have to be pumped up with extra caffeine."

She knows there's caffeine in Pepsi and Coke, so she limits those. But caffeine is in lots of other products, too, including Mountain Dew.

Consumer Reports' David Heim says if caffeine has been added to a food, you'll see it listed under ingredients. But manufacturers don't have to list how much. And if caffeine is found naturally in foods, such as coffee or chocolate, it doesn't have to be listed on the label at all.
Consumer Reports checked the caffeine content in a variety of foods and drinks and turned up some surprising results.

"Ounce for ounce Sunkist Orange soda has nearly as much caffeine as colas do."

So does the VitaminWater from Glaceau (PRON: GLASS-ee-oh) and this Sobe (PRON: SO-bee) Energy drink.

There's also a hefty dose of caffeine in several new drinks, including
d-n-l, Pepsi Blue, Atomic Jacked
Apple Juice Drink and Red Fusion from Dr. Pepper.

Manufacturers say caffeine adds flavor.

Consumer Reports testers asked 56 middle-school-aged kids to do a taste test.

"What I need you to do is take two sips of the first one..."

The children were given unmarked cups of regular Coke and Pepsi, as well as the caffeine-free versions. There was no clear-cut preference.

"They were both sweet and like bubbly."

"They both tasted the same to me."

Some children actually liked the caffeine-free colas better.

"The first one it had more taste and flavor to me than the second one."

Consumer Reports' advice for parents — check the label on drinks closely. You'll find plenty of caffeine-free sodas, including Orange Slice, Mug Root Beer and Sprite.

And remember, caffeine doesn't have to be listed on the label of chocolate or coffee-flavored foods because the caffeine occurs naturally. In its study, Consumer Reports found that a small container of Dannon's Coffee Flavored Low Fat Yogurt has the same amount of caffeine as a can of Coke.

You can get a complete listing of the amount of caffeine found in the products Consumer Reports analyzed by going to Consumerreports.org. And if you want to see how quickly you can spot a caffeinated product — try taking the online caffeine quiz you'll find there.

Children could be getting a lot more caffeine than you realize. Manufacturers are adding it to more and more products and companies don't have to list how much caffeine they've added. Consumer Reports just analyzed 25 drinks and foods and has important advice for parents.

Like many parents, Dawn Manniello (PRON: Man-YELL-oh) doesn't want her children drinking caffeinated sodas. She says it gets them all wound up.

"Children are energetic enough as it is. I don't feel they have to be pumped up with extra caffeine."

She knows there's caffeine in Pepsi and Coke, so she limits those. But caffeine is in lots of other products, too, including Mountain Dew.

Consumer Reports' David Heim says if caffeine has been added to a food, you'll see it listed under ingredients. But manufacturers don't have to list how much. And if caffeine is found naturally in foods, such as coffee or chocolate, it doesn't have to be listed on the label at all.
Consumer Reports checked the caffeine content in a variety of foods and drinks and turned up some surprising results.

"Ounce for ounce Sunkist Orange soda has nearly as much caffeine as colas do."

So does the VitaminWater from Glaceau (PRON: GLASS-ee-oh) and this Sobe (PRON: SO-bee) Energy drink.

There's also a hefty dose of caffeine in several new drinks, including
d-n-l, Pepsi Blue, Atomic Jacked
Apple Juice Drink and Red Fusion from Dr. Pepper.

Manufacturers say caffeine adds flavor.

Consumer Reports testers asked 56 middle-school-aged kids to do a taste test.

"What I need you to do is take two sips of the first one..."

The children were given unmarked cups of regular Coke and Pepsi, as well as the caffeine-free versions. There was no clear-cut preference.

"They were both sweet and like bubbly."

"They both tasted the same to me."

Some children actually liked the caffeine-free colas better.

"The first one it had more taste and flavor to me than the second one."

Consumer Reports' advice for parents — check the label on drinks closely. You'll find plenty of caffeine-free sodas, including Orange Slice, Mug Root Beer and Sprite.

And remember, caffeine doesn't have to be listed on the label of chocolate or coffee-flavored foods because the caffeine occurs naturally. In its study, Consumer Reports found that a small container of Dannon's Coffee Flavored Low Fat Yogurt has the same amount of caffeine as a can of Coke.

You can get a complete listing of the amount of caffeine found in the products Consumer Reports analyzed by going to Consumerreports.org. And if you want to see how quickly you can spot a caffeinated product — try taking the online caffeine quiz you'll find there.

Children could be getting a lot more caffeine than you realize. Manufacturers are adding it to more and more products and companies don't have to list how much caffeine they've added. Consumer Reports just analyzed 25 drinks and foods and has important advice for parents.

Like many parents, Dawn Manniello (PRON: Man-YELL-oh) doesn't want her children drinking caffeinated sodas. She says it gets them all wound up.

"Children are energetic enough as it is. I don't feel they have to be pumped up with extra caffeine."

She knows there's caffeine in Pepsi and Coke, so she limits those. But caffeine is in lots of other products, too, including Mountain Dew.

Consumer Reports' David Heim says if caffeine has been added to a food, you'll see it listed under ingredients. But manufacturers don't have to list how much. And if caffeine is found naturally in foods, such as coffee or chocolate, it doesn't have to be listed on the label at all.
Consumer Reports checked the caffeine content in a variety of foods and drinks and turned up some surprising results.

"Ounce for ounce Sunkist Orange soda has nearly as much caffeine as colas do."

So does the VitaminWater from Glaceau (PRON: GLASS-ee-oh) and this Sobe (PRON: SO-bee) Energy drink.

There's also a hefty dose of caffeine in several new drinks, including
d-n-l, Pepsi Blue, Atomic Jacked
Apple Juice Drink and Red Fusion from Dr. Pepper.

Manufacturers say caffeine adds flavor.

Consumer Reports testers asked 56 middle-school-aged kids to do a taste test.

"What I need you to do is take two sips of the first one..."

The children were given unmarked cups of regular Coke and Pepsi, as well as the caffeine-free versions. There was no clear-cut preference.

"They were both sweet and like bubbly."

"They both tasted the same to me."

Some children actually liked the caffeine-free colas better.

"The first one it had more taste and flavor to me than the second one."

Consumer Reports' advice for parents — check the label on drinks closely. You'll find plenty of caffeine-free sodas, including Orange Slice, Mug Root Beer and Sprite.

And remember, caffeine doesn't have to be listed on the label of chocolate or coffee-flavored foods because the caffeine occurs naturally. In its study, Consumer Reports found that a small container of Dannon's Coffee Flavored Low Fat Yogurt has the same amount of caffeine as a can of Coke.

You can get a complete listing of the amount of caffeine found in the products Consumer Reports analyzed by going to Consumerreports.org. And if you want to see how quickly you can spot a caffeinated product — try taking the online caffeine quiz you'll find there.


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