Worker killed in drilling accident remembered as kind-hearted

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (KKTV) - "You're not supposed to bury your children."

Elizabeth Hey is still grappling with the horrific events of last week.

Her son, 25-year-old Benjamin Hey, was one of the two men killed in a suspected electrocution after their truck hit an overhead power line near the Ray Nixon Power Plant. Hey and a target="_blank" href="http://www.kktv.com/content/news/Family-grieves-worker-killed-in-suspected-electrocution-near-Ray-Nixon-Power-Plant-482545601.html">Joe Sampedro, along with a third man and the sole survivor of the incident, were drilling for soil at the time as part of a Springs Utilities project they were subcontracted for.

Elizabeth Hey said the day she found out was "like living a nightmare."

"I was at work. It was 10:30 at night, the coroner came here to talk to my other kids, and my son called me and he was like, 'Mom, Ben’s dead.' And I was like, 'What?' It wasn’t computing. It didn’t hit me at first, I was just in shock.”

In the day since, Hey says she seesaws between shock and devastation.

"I go from crying hysterically to completely numb ... it just doesn’t seem real.”

Hey told 11 News her son was a kind-hearted person with a soft spot for animals, who hoped to someday work as a veterinarian tech.

"He was kind ... he was nerdy and loved "Godzilla" and dinosaurs and zombies. ... And his extreme love for animals, especially creatures. He had a tarantula named Fluffy when he was little."

Benjamin Hey and Sampedro were good friends, Hey said.

"He lived with Joe, the other victim, and asked if he needed any help that day and he went to go work with him. So I didn’t even know he was out there doing this kind of work."

Sampedro's family has put up a memorial at the site where he died. Hey says it's too painful for her to visit the scene yet.

"I share their pain," she told 11 News. "I know exactly what they're going through.