Here Comes The Rain...

While we need the rain, we may see too much of a good thing, too quickly.  Another round of storms is expected on Wednesday evening, as a cold front moves through Southern Colorado.  With plenty of moisture for storms to tap, the stronger storms will produce very heavy rain.  Our computer models are suggesting that we will see the locally heavy rain continue on Wednesday night and into Thursday.  In fact, some areas could pick up 2 to 5 inches of rain from late Wednesday through Thursday.  If that happens, Flash Flooding will become a serious risk.  Given how dry it has been, the ground is very hard.  Rain that comes too fast will runoff into creeks and ditches.  Those same creeks and ditches that have been dry, or had little water moving through them, will become raging rivers in a short time.

Remember Flash Flooding kills more people every year,  than any other weather event. 
Flash Flooding Safety Tips:

MOVE TO HIGHER GROUND IF HIGH WATER IS THREATENING YOUR AREA.

NEVER PLAY IN CREEKS, STREAMS, OR DITCHES, ESPECIALLY WITH THE TYPE OF WEATHER WE HAVE IN THE FORECAST.

NEVER DRIVE THROUGH A FLOODED AREAS

The forecast looks to dry out a little as we head into the weekend.  Until then, get ready for some beneficial rain.

Chief Meteorologist Brian Bledsoe

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Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
  • by Nicolette Botte Location: Ny west babylon on Oct 24, 2008 at 11:18 AM
    im sad its going to rain tomorrow
  • by vanessa Location: california on Oct 2, 2008 at 09:13 PM
    what persentage is it going to rain this saturday
  • by ryan Location: monument on Aug 14, 2008 at 03:24 PM
    josh listen were not going to have severe weather in the late fall and early winter do you understand were not like the southeast like always we will get snow in the winter and not severe weather don't even think about the southeast think about the good times in the winter
  • by Josh Location: Black forest on Aug 11, 2008 at 12:29 AM
    WOW talk about some rain.. its 1:20am and a storm just flew right threw here. That was crazy. Lightning everywhere and a ton of rain and some hail. There was so much lightning that the power went out for a couple of minutes. I like the rain, but not like that. The storm looked like it bow echoed off the mountains. I never thought that thunder would shake me awake.
  • by Susan Location: Falcon on Aug 10, 2008 at 04:33 PM
    Can someone let me know where I can find rain totals on this site? Falcon is showing 0 precip for the month and we have been getting quite a bit of rain. Thanks.
  • by Stephanie Ortmann Location: Weather Center on Aug 10, 2008 at 02:40 PM
    I'm going to try and answer both Terry and Carol at the same time here... Personally, I like to use the dewpoint temperature more in my forecast to explain the amount of moisture in place rather than the humidity value because the dew point is a far better measurement of how the air feels outside. Dew point and humidity are not the same thing. Dew point is very simply explained: it is how much moisture is in the air. Relative humidity though is a function of both moisture content (the dew point) and the air temperature. It's a percentage of the amount of moisture present in the atmosphere relative to the amount that would be present if the air were saturated. The humidity value by itself does not directly indicate the actual amount of moisture present in the air. I hope my explanations helped! Here is a link to a weather calculator that calculates the relative humidity value when given the temperature and dew point: http://www.hpc.ncep.noaa.gov/html/dewrh.shtml.
  • by Terry Location: 81025 on Aug 9, 2008 at 12:16 PM
    I know humidity,I hear dew point. I understand that dew point is the temp. where moisture forms. I want to know the conversion factor.
  • by Carol Location: Colorado Springs on Aug 8, 2008 at 10:29 AM
    I have a question. Why don't they give the humidity with the weather report anymore?
  • by Brian Location: Weather Center on Aug 7, 2008 at 08:20 PM
    That's right guys, it certainly is about time. Despite us seeing some heavy rain, not everyone has seen it. In fact, it hasn't rained that much at the "official" rain guage... the CO Springs Airport. So, we remain 8" below normal for the year. Northern El Paso County has seen some awesome rain, as Josh mentioned. However, the 4" in one hour doesn't do any good. Most of that runs off and doesn't soak into the ground. Four inches of rain in 4 to 6 hours, would be ideal. The good news is that we will keep our rich moisture source in our area. With some daytime heating and a couple disturbances moving through, it looks like rain chances will remain in the forecast. This pattern isn't ideal for eliminate the drought, but it is much better than what we've seen during the previous 7 months. Thanks for reading our blog.
  • by Ryan Location: Monument on Aug 7, 2008 at 02:35 PM
    well finally our wish came true we really got some much needed rain I was reading the rocky mountain news on saturday and the city of denver was already down 7.03 inches of rain this could be a mericale
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